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Blog


Gretel and the family Volkswagen

I began my career in a small town and as was common at the time found myself on emergency calls frequently. One such Sunday afternoon I received a panicked call from the owner of a German shepherd. They had been working in their yard on a beautiful afternoon. To allow Gretel to enjoy the day they tied her leash to the bumper of the family Volkswagen. All was well and the husband needed to run to the store for some yard supplies. To the horror of his wife, he forgot that Gretel was still attached to the car.


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Oki

Oki was not a pet of mine but over the years I have to admit I feel very close to a dog I have never met. If you drive into our hospital you can’t miss him. I am very proud to tell you he is buried on our grounds.

Oki was the third most decorated dog in World War II. His story is one of bravery and courage. I am not qualified to tell you the story but will give some details. What really hits home about Oki is that along with his owner, Robert Harr, they are the shining example of the human animal bond.


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Dr. Anna Worth

I would like to share some thoughts about a good friend of mine and a fellow past president of the American Animal Hospital Association.

Anna learned very shortly after I passed the presidency to her that she had inoperable cancer. I was devastated and will never forget the pain when I heard the news.

We had worked together for years as we progressed through AAHA leadership. It never occurs to you that something could threaten such a bond.


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Babe Griffen and Rico

Babe Griffin was a client of mine shortly after I graduated from veterinary school. He was a great guy and I always tried to make extra time in my appointments to talk to him. Babe was probably in his seventies at the time. He was a former boxer and a fight promoter. Not that it would have been much of an accomplishment but he could have taken me in the ring even at his advancing age. Babe had a Boston terrier named Rico. He loved Rico and they were rarely separated.


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What is relaxin?

Relaxin is a protein hormone that is released from both the placenta and in many species, also from the ovaries. It is primarily secreted from the placenta in cats and dogs, making it a useful test in pregnancy diagnosis.

What does relaxin do?


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What is prolactin?

Prolactin is a protein hormone that is secreted from the pituitary gland (at the base of the animals' brain). It is normally found at elevated levels in serum during maintenance of the corpus luteum, at the beginning of the anestrus period, and during early lactation.

What does prolactin do?

Prolactin as it name suggests, it the primary hormone for production of milk from the mammary glands. Prolactin also has effects on the maintenance of the corpus luteum which during pregnancy, helps the mother remain pregnant.


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What is progesterone? (Feline)

Progesterone is a hormone produced by the ovaries and placenta that helps to maintain pregnancy. It's main effects on tissues inside the body include: induction of an elaborate network of glands (endometrial glands) in the uterus to help provide nutrition to the early conceptus(baby) and become the maternal side of the placenta (connection between baby and mom). During pregnancy, it helps keep the uterine muscle layers relatively quiet so as not to disrupt a pregnancy.


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What is LH (luteinizing hormone) & when is it released? (Feline)

Luteinizing hormone is a protein hormone that is released from a part of the brain, called the pituitary. Around puberty, or the beginning of a breeding season, LH is released in an episodic manner (in short pulses) after stimulation from another master hormone (gonadotropin releasing hormone or GnRH for short) in response to all sorts of cues such as- Environmental cues like: daylight length, rainfall and temperature. Social cues: like presence of a mate or other cycling females and/or physiologic cues: like attaining a certain body size supportive of reproduction.


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