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Dogs

Holiday Foods on the Naughty List

We all love to indulge around the holidays, especially when it comes to food. Unfortunately, tossing your pet table scraps as a “treat” can cause unnecessary upset to their digestive system. Read our recommendations before including fido or fluffy at the dinner table this year. Your pet’s tummy will thank you!

 

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Veterinary Veggies: Should You Add Some Home Cooking to Your Pet’s Diet?

You and your pet both know the rule: No table food! On occasion, however, your vet may actually recommend human fare for your furry friend. What’s the deal?

Vegetables are an excellent source of antioxidants—dietary substances that can repair and prevent damage to the body’s cells—for both humans and animals. While antioxidants in tablet form only contain a handful of different antioxidants, vegetables can contain hundreds, many of which work together for an even more powerful effect.

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Senior Pets: Old Age is Not a Disease!

Have an older pet at home? 

Just like humans, pets can develop a number of new health issues as they enter their senior years. Often attributed to simply “slowing down,” it is not uncommon for many of these age-related problems to go untreated or even unnoticed. However, many of these changes can be effectively managed with proper veterinary care.

Common age-related medical issues in pets include:

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Commercial Rodenticide Emits Gas Toxic to Pets and Humans

Rodenticide, commonly used to kill rats, mice, moles and gophers, comes in many forms and can cause a variety of serious problems in our pets.

Rodenticide containing cholecalciferol (Vitamin D) causes high calcium levels in the blood and can damage the kidneys, central nervous system, heart and intestines. Poisons that contain bromethalin are neurotoxic, causing paralysis and possibly coma, and brodifacoum, warfarin and other anticoagulant rodenticides cause an inability to clot the blood and often lead to internal bleeding.

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Keep Pets Happy and Healthy This Halloween

Halloween is supposed to be spooky, but it can be an especially stressful night for the furry little monsters in your house. Follow these tips to keep the holiday fun—not frightening—for your family pets.

Stranger danger!

Visitors (in costume, no less!) are often scary and stressful for pets.

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Laser Pointers: A Good Idea for Your Cat but Not for Your Dog

Most cats love laser pointers. You can press the button and let the red laser land in a pinpoint on the floor, or the wall...just out of reach of your cat, and watch him pounce. It’s entertaining to watch and it’s entertaining for your cat. They’re not so good, however, for your dog. But first, let’s look at how they benefit your kitty. 

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Snakes and How to Keep Your Pet Safe

Pop quiz time – you are walking with your dog in the woods and come upon a snake.

Would you be able to tell a venomous snake from one of the harmless varieties?  Would you know what to do if it was a venomous snake and your pet was bitten?  Here are some answers we hope will help!

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National Pet Obesity Is Increasing

According to a 2012 survey by the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention (APOP), 55 percent of U.S. dogs and cats are now overweight.

Many people think fat cats and pudgy pups are cute, but consider this:

Overweight pets don’t feel good. Overweight pets often appear tired or lazy, lack energy and playfulness, are reluctant to jump or run, have difficulty grooming, lag behind on walks and pant heavily. In addition, the extra weight puts stress on their joints, hearts, lungs, liver, kidneys are more.

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